Allen, Christopher D
Ashrafi, Kaveh
Atabai, Kamran
Black, Brian L
Blanc, Paul D
Botvinick, Elias H
Boushey, Homer A
Broaddus, V Courtney
Brown, James K
Bruneau, Benoit G
Calfee, Carolyn S.
Caughey, George H
Chang, Andy
Chapman, Harold A
Charo, Israel F
Chawla, Ajay
Chuang, Pao-Tien
Clyman, Ronald I
Conklin, Bruce R
Connolly, Andrew J
Conte, Michael S
Coughlin, Shaun R
Degrado, William F
Deo, Rahul C
Derynck, Rik M
Dobbs, Leland G
Engel, Joanne N
Erle, David J
Fahy, John Vincent
Fineman, Jeffrey R
Ganz, Peter
Gardner, David G
Gartner, Zev Jordan
Glantz, Stanton A
Gold, Warren M
Grabe, Michael D
Gropper, Michael
Grossman, William
Hart, Daniel O
Hata, Akiko
Hawgood, Samuel
Hoffman, Julien I
Huang, Guo
Ingraham, Holly A
Irannejad, Roshanak
Jan, Lily Y
Julius, David J
Jura, Natalia Z
Kan, Yuet W
Kane, John P
Karliner, Joel S
Kornberg, Thomas B
Koth, Laura L
Krauss, Ronald M
Kurtz, Theodore W
Kwok, Pui-Yan
Lazarus, Stephen C
Lee, Randall J
Lim, Wendell A
Ma, Dengke
Mahley, Robert W
Malloy, Mary J.
Mann, Michael J
Matthay, Michael A
Mcdonald, Donald M
Mikawa, Takashi
Minor, Daniel L
Mostov, Keith E
Oishi, Peter E
Olgin, Jeffrey E
Pearce, David
Peng, Tien
Redberg, Rita F
Reiter, Jeremy F.
Rock, Jason R.
Rowitch, David H
Scheinman, Melvin M
Schiller, Nelson B
Seiple, Ian Bass
Sheppard, Dean
Shokat, Kevan M
Shu, Xiaokun
Shum, Anthony K
Simpson, Paul C
Springer, Matthew L
Srivastava, Deepak
Teitel, David F
Von Zastrow, Mark E
Wang, Rong
Wang, Biao
Wang, Lei
Weiner, Orion D
Weiss, Arthur
Weiss, Ethan J
Werb, Zena
Woodruff, Prescott G
Xu, Allison Wanting
Yeghiazarians, Yerem
Zovein, Ann C

CVRI Scientists

Guo Huang, Ph.D.
Assistant Prof in Residence

Research Interests:
Comparative study of heart development and regeneration, ischemic heart diseases, stem cell, cardiomyocyte proliferation, regenerative biology

Summary:
The ability to regenerate damaged or lost tissues varies dramatically across organisms and developmental stages. For example, heart regeneration is robust in adult zebrafish and newborn mouse while very limited in adult mouse and human. This presents a particular problem for patients with a heart attack who suffer from a significant loss of heart muscle cells and subsequent life-threatening functional deterioration of the heart.

By taking a comparative approach to study regenerative versus non-regenerative heart repair processes in zebrafish and mouse, we seek to uncover ancestrally conserved injury responses and more importantly, to identify the signals blocking regeneration in the mammalian heart and consequently new treatment strategies for heart diseases.

CVRIHead