Category: Advanced technologies


Mark Looney, M.D.

 

Research Interests:

Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, blood transfusions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, neutrophils, neutrophil extracellular traps, platelets, lung transplantation

Summary:

My laboratory is broadly interesting in study innate immune biology in the normal and injured lung.  Using pre-clinical models of acute lung injury, we have focused on neutrophils and platelets, the latter being a bon a fide immune cell with powerful inflammatory potential.  One consequence of platelet-neutrophil interactions is the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which we study in both sterile and pathogen-induced lung injury models.  We are determining the mechanisms by which platelets trigger NETs and novel pathways to target NETs—which we have discovered are overall barrier disruptive in the lung.   

We also use two-photon intravital lung microscopy as a tool for discovery.  Using this technique, we have determined that the lung is a major source of mature platelet production in mice.  Furthermore, megakaryocytes reside in the extravascular lung and may have potent local immune effects.  The lung also contains a wide-range of hematopoietic progenitors, which have the capacity to leave the lung and engraft in the bone marrow for multi-lineage blood production.  We are determining the niche-promoting factors responsible for hematopoietic progenitor residence in the lung and the contributions of these cells to the local immune repertoire.

We have an expanding interest in lung transplantation studies, including ischemia-reperfusion injury (primary graft dysfunction) and modeling chronic lung allograft dysfunction (bronchiolitis obliterans).  We use the mouse single lung transplantation technique for these studies and to create lung chimeras for investigation.

UCSF Profiles Page: http://profiles.ucsf.edu/mark.looney


Ian Bass Seiple, Ph.D.

 

Seiple

Research Interests:

Synthesis of biologically active small molecules

Summary:

Despite centuries of innovation, chemistry is often still the limiting factor in the development of small molecule drug candidates, molecular probes, or novel chemical libraries. Many molecules that have tremendous biological potential are challenging to modify with known chemical methodologies. The overarching goal of our program is to develop practical methods for the synthesis of molecules that have previously been inaccessible. Many of our current projects are focused on the synthesis of novel antibiotics that can be used to treat life-threatening infections of the heart, lungs, and upper respiratory tract.

UCSF Profiles Page


Orion D Weiner, Ph.D.

Weiner

Research Interests:
Cell polarity, chemotaxis, actin cytoskeleton, cell signaling, cell migration, microscopy, biochemistry, neutrophils, systems biology, self-organization, inflammation, Rac, PI3Kinase, WAVE complex.

Summary:
Proper movement in response to cues from the outside world is as important for single cells as it is for drivers on a busy highway. If cues are misinterpreted or the movement goes awry, terrible accidents ensue, the delicate wiring of the nervous system fails, single-celled organisms can`t hunt or mate, the immune system ceases to function properly, and cancer cells spread from one part of the body to another. How do single cells, without the benefit of a brain, interpret the subtle micro-world of attractants and repellents to decide where to go? Our research focuses on dissecting the inner workings of the cellular “compass” used to guide cells on their journey. Because the core of the compass has been conserved over more than a billion years of evolution, we have been able to combine discoveries from yeast to humans to glimpse some rough outlines of the underlying machinery. However, many of the important connections are still missing. Our research focuses on identifying these key missing components and how they are wired together to process information with the hope that we can eventually make cells move when (and where) we want them to and stop them when we don’t.

UCSF Profiles Page


Lei Wang, Ph.D.

wangL

Research Interests:
Design and encode novel amino acids to study biological processes and to develop new biotherapeutics.

Summary:
We build proteins in living cells using new amino acids. By harnessing the novel properties of these new building blocks, we probe biological processes in their natural settings and engineer unique biomolecules to understand mechanisms of cellular function and to develop new treatments of diseases.

UCSF Profiles Page


Mark E Von Zastrow, Ph.D., M.D.

Von Zastrow

Research Interests:
Subcellular organization and dynamics of receptor-mediated signaling systems in eukaryotic cells.

Summary:
Our laboratory studies mechanisms by which receptors that control cardiovascular biology are regulated. These receptors are important therapeutic targets and their regulation is known to be disturbed in a number of important disease states.

UCSF Profiles Page


Matthew L Springer, Ph.D.

 

Matt 2016

Research Interests:
Angiogenesis, VEGF, stem cells, progenitor cells, gene therapy, heart failure, myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, cardiac regeneration, peripheral artery disease, vascular injury, nitric oxide, flavanols, skeletal muscle myoblasts, secondhand smoke

Summary:
Our research interests include cell therapy and gene therapy approaches to studying cardiovascular disease, with the goals of exploring potential treatments and understanding underlying mechanisms involved in angiogenesis, vascular function, and treatments for myocardial infarction. The laboratory is studying the effects of VEGF and pleiotrophin gene therapy on the heart and limb vasculature in mice. Further interests center in the therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided bone marrow cell implantation into the heart after myocardial infarction, with a special emphasis on the therapeutic implications of the age and cardiac disease state of the cell donor. Similarly, the lab is studying the effects of age and disease on circulating angiogenic cells (sometimes called endothelial progenitor cells), with a focus on the roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide in the function of these cells. Lastly, they have developed a rat model of endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation, and are using it to examine mechanisms underlying vascular reactivity and how they are affected by cigarette smoke exposure.

UCSF Profiles Page


Paul C Simpson, M.D.

Simpson

Research Interests:
Molecular & cellular mechanisms of myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure Adrenergic receptors, signaling, and drug development

Summary:
Dr. Simpson is working to develop new drugs to treat heart failure, one of the most common causes of hospitalization and death in the USA and Western World. He has recently identified a promising drug target, alpha-1-adrenergic receptors, and is working to translate this into clinical use.

UCSF Profiles Page


Xiaokun Shu, Ph.D.

Shu

Research Interests:
Protein Rational Design and Directed Evolution for Biology and Medicine

Summary:
We are developing technologies to bridge the gap between clinical medicine and molecular biology. Their successful use in biomedicine will significantly improve treatment of disease.

UCSF Profiles Page


Nelson B Schiller, M.D.

Schiller

Research Interests:
Dr. Schiller specializes in the use of echocardiography in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. His research interests center around the quantitation of left ventricular function by quantitative two-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler.

Summary:
Measuring the heart has been a preoccupation of civilizations since ancient Egypt. Measuring the heart using noninvasive techniques that are free of ionizing radiation has riveted the attention of modern medicine because knowledge of the size of the heart’s anatomic parts provides powerful diagnostic and therapeutic information. Dr. Nelson B. Schiller a member of the Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division, CVRI and John J. Sampson-Lucie Stern Endowed Chair in Cardiology, has spent his career investigating the application of echocardiography to the precise measurement and clinical application of the volume, weight and hemodynamics of the chambers and valves of the heart. His work is currently centered on the Heart and Soul Study (Mary Whooley, MD PI), where echocardiography measurements are being related to outcomes of heart disease.

UCSF Profiles Page


Daniel L Minor, Ph.D.

Research Interests:
Membrane proteins; potassium channels, calcium channels

Summary:
Hearts, brains, muscles, and senses require electrical signals to function. We aim to understand the basic cellular components responsible for generating electrical activity. We focus on understanding the structure, function, and regulation of ion channels from a high-resolution viewpoint, understanding how channel mutations cause disease, and on developing new tools for controlling channel function.

Video A Universal CaM Switch Changes the Kv7 Channel

UCSF Profiles Page


Michael J Mann, M.D.

Mann

Research Interests:
1. Molecular/cellular biology and molecular genetics of atherosclerosis and heart failure. 2. Development of hybrid surgical and molecular/cellular therapies for heart disease. 3. Stem and progenitor cell transplantation for cardiovascular regeneration. 4. Cardiovascular tissue engineering. 5. Reduction to clinical practice of current methods in genetic, molecular and cellular disease intervention. 6. Novel targeted molecular therapies for lung cancer. 7. Molecular profiling of cancers for personalized medicine. 8. Development of novel methods of in vivo/ex vivo gene therapy and gene transfer. 9. Novel approaches to therapeutic neovascularization for coronary and peripheral ischemic disease. 10. Cardiovascular cell cycle biology. 11. Myocardial gene therapy.

Summary:
Dr. Mann’s research focuses on the molecular and cellular biology of heart disease with an emphasis on practical ways to develop new treatments for heart failure. These involve potential gene and molecular therapies, combinations of molecular and cell-based treatments with surgical reconstruction, and evaluation of novel materials for the development of bioartificial replacements of lost or damaged heart tissue.

UCSF Profiles Page


Wendell A Lim, Ph.D.

Lim

Research Interests:
Signal transduction, synthetic biology, systems biology, structural biology, protein-protein interactions, cell motility, MAP kinase cascades, GTPase pathways

Summary:
Wendell Lim’s Lab is working on creating a detailed instruction manual – a sort of user’s guide – that explains how biochemical circuits control a cell’s function and ultimately its fate. The long-term goal is to use the instruction manual to help scientists design cells to deliver therapeutic payloads, repair cancerous lesions, or attack microscopic pathogens. Cells are complex mechanical and sensing devices that can carry out highly complex tasks, such as secreting antibodies or forming repair structures like blood clots and bone. Cells contain signaling pathways that take in and integrate vast amounts of information about the cells’ environment, and they process and use this information to make complex decisions about how to respond to changing environmental conditions. If more is understood about how these processes work, there is the potential to change cells and help solve problems in biotechnology or health, and to treat disease more rationally.

UCSF Profiles Page