Category: Vascular Biology and Atherothrombosis


William F Degrado, Ph.D.

Degrado

Research Interests:

De novo protein design, drug design, protein structure/function, membrane protein structure, integrins, antivirals, antibiotics.

Summary:
DeGrado’s group works on the design of molecules that inform our understanding of biological processes. They also have developed small molecules drugs for various as potential pharmaceuticals, including antithrombotics, heparin reversal agents, antibacterials, and antiviral agents.

 

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Michael S Conte, M.D.

Conte

Research Interests:
Aortic reconstruction, carotid artery disease, lower extremity arterial occlusive disease, diabetic vascular disease

Summary:
Our laboratory studies the healing process in blood vessels which currently limits the long term success of procedures like angioplasty and bypass surgery. Our goals are to develop new drug and molecular therapies to prevent failures due to vessel re-narrowing, and to better identify patients at increased risk.

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Ajay Chawla, M.D., Ph.D

Chawla

Research Interests:
Immune determinants of metabolism and regeneration; Nuclear receptor signaling in innate immune cells

Summary:
Across species, the aberrant activation of the innate immune system has been linked to pathogenesis of metabolic, inflammatory and degenerative diseases. However, the molecular pathways by which innate immune cells coordinate these diverse programs remain poorly understood. Our laboratory aims to elucidate the regulatory role of nuclear receptors and co-activator proteins in innate immune activation, and the importance of these pathways in paradigms of health and disease, such as obesity, diabetes, cancer and tissue regeneration.

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Israel F Charo, M.D. , Ph.D.

Charo

Research Interests:
Structure and Function of Chemokine Receptors

Summary:
The goal of our research is to use gene targeting and creation of transgenic mice to study the in vivo functions of chemokines and chemokine receptors. Chemokines are proinflammatory cytokines that function in leukocyte chemoattraction and activation and block HIV�1 infection of target cells through interactions with chemokine receptors. In addition to their function in viral disease, chemokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, glomerulonephritis, and inflammatory lung disease. The chemokine family is growing rapidly. Our laboratory focuses primarily on two chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine, a recently described and structurally unique chemokine.

 

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Elias H Botvinick, M.D.

Botvinick

Research Interests:
Nuclear medicine, nuclear cardiology, PET/CT, MRI, CT, cardiac cardiology, echocardiology, nuclear magnetic resonance, cardiovascular imaging, stress testimg, heart, myocardial perfusion, scintigraphy, coronary, sychrony, sychronization

Summary:
My research centers on a collaborative effort to develop noninvasive imaging methods for the identification and evaluation of cardiac anatomy and pathophysiology, and apply them to the diagnosis, risk stratification and monitoring of clinical disease. The work is centered on nuclear medicine methods, PET and SPECT, as well as echocardiography, MRI, and CT.

 

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Ethan J. Weiss, M.D.

WeissE

Research Interests:
Coagulation, thrombosis, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, genetics, platelet, sexual dimorphism, growth hormone signaling, fatty liver disease, regulation of energy metabolism and obesity

Summary:
Our group has two main interests. The first is to understand the mechanisms underlying the regulation of energy metabolism by growth hormone. Growth hormone is well-known to promote lipolysis as a means of mobilizing energy from stores in the form of free fatty acids. To accommodate tissues and organs with increased energy needs, fatty acid uptake is also regulated by growth hormone. The precise molecular mechanisms driving these two processes remain unclear. With an aim toward understanding mechanisms of obesity and related conditions, we use a molecular and cellular approach combined with mouse genetic models to understand how growth hormone regulates lipolysis and the uptake of fatty acid by cells and tissues.

Our second interest is in defining novel mechanisms of thrombosis susceptibility. Our group has had a long interest in thrombosis. Recently, we have focused on understanding ways to modulate thrombosis risk without increasing the risk of bleeding. Here, we also use molecular, cellular, and mouse genetics approaches.

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Yerem Yeghiazarians, M.D.

Yeghiazarians

Research Interests:
Stem cell (adult or embryonic), Myocardial infarction, Heart failure, Cardiomyopathy

Summary:
The goal of the UCSF Translational Cardiac Stem Cell Program is to bring recent advances in basic science and biology of stem cells to patients with heart disease, heart failure, and cardiomyopathy. There are many different types of stem cells. These can be broadly categorized as adult stem cells (derived from the patient) vs. embryonic type of stem cells. Our group is interested in studying which type of stem cell(s) would be most useful as novel therapy in patients after a heart attack, and exploring the mechanisms by which stem cells can potentially improve the cardiac function.